Easy Steps to learning Syllable Division Types, an Overview from Orton Gillingham Coaching


This article is to provide an overview of syllable division rules. A birds-eye view into why we are learning REVLOC and how to utilize syllable labeling. What is syllable division? Most of my videos so far have been going over syllable types REVLOC, but I want to give an overview of why we are teaching REVLOC in the first place. Syllable division is a way to break down words into more digestible pieces for easier reading and spelling. Syllable Types Review – REVLOC There are six syllable types in REVLOC and the word REVLOC is the order in which one syllable type is dominant...

Making Sense of the Consonant Reading Deck from Orton Gillingham Coaching


YouTube Video on Making Sense of the Deck from Orton Gillingham Coaching: https://youtu.be/XJaIKgd1g5o What is a reading consonant? A reading consonant is when you ask what sound(s) letter or letter combinations make. For example, b says /b/, it only makes that one sound. But, g can make two sounds, /g/ and /j/ as in gem.   In comparison, spelling a sound, for example, is when you ask a student, what letter or letters makes the sound “s” and a student will say, s, c, sc, and ps all make the sound “s.” What’s Up with This Deck? The Pile For the purpose of making sense...

Teaching R-Controlled Vowels from Orton Gillingham Coaching


To Watch on YouTube please visit: https://youtu.be/IQ5Xb5dkCSc Teaching R-Controlled Vowels I’ve talked about syllables in my past posts, but within syllables, and before teaching a syllable type, you might have noticed I also teach the vowel type. For example, you wouldn’t start with a closed syllable before talking about short vowels in depth. Teaching short vowels we use drill cards, vowel strips, writing activities with sand or tracing on sand paper, we have a student listen to a sound we are saying and write that short vowel on a paper. Then we graduate to putting those vowels with our consonants and reading...

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Activities for Teaching the Sounds of -ed


Teaching the Sounds of the Suffix -ed Most people know the sound -ed is a suffix, but unless a person has been taught or thought about it, many may not realize that -ed says three sounds: /ed/ (as in the name Ed), /d/ and in loved, and /t/ as in kissed. Drill Cards in Two Places The -ed drill card is in two places. First, it’s in the Consonant Reading Deck, used as a phonogram drill.   It’s not so much about -ed being a suffix at this point, as a letter combination with three sounds.   The /ed/ sound is also used after...

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Open Syllables, Tools and Strategies


Video on Strategies and Teaching, with 7 activities, Open Syllables Teaching Open Syllables, Tools & Strategies Open Syllable is the third syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC system of syllable patterns. Open Syllable Pattern The Open Syllable pattern is CV or V – Consonant, Vowel (or just Vowel). The open vowel at the end of the syllable makes the vowel long, or “makes the vowel say its name.” Initial Terms A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. By this point, you will already have taught Closed and Magic E patterns.*

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Consonant Sound Spelling Tools & Strategies


What Is Sound Reading and Sound Spelling? Sound Reading asks, what does this letter say? Sometimes it says one sound and sometimes it says multiple sounds. Examples: What does S say? S says, /s/ and /z/ as in sun and rose What does F say? F says /f/ as in fan Sound Spelling asks, what letter or letter combinations make this sound? Examples: What letters say, /s/? The letters S and C say /s/, as in sun and city, and more advanced, SC, keyword scissors and PS, keyword psychic (or psalm) What letters say, /f/? The letters that say /f/ are f and ph, as in fan...

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Magic-E (Silent E) Syllables, Tools & Strategies


Video on Magic E Syllables in REVLOC System of Labeling Syllables Teaching Magic-E (Silent E) Syllables, Tools & Strategies Magic E is the second syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC system of syllable patterns. Magic E Syllable Pattern The Magic E pattern is VCE – Vowel, Consonant, Silent E at the end. The silent E makes the vowel say its name, giving it a long vowel sound. What a Student Should Know to Learn the Magic-E Pattern A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not have to...

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Scope & Sequence, Should I Use One? What Does Multi-Sensory Look Like?


Scope & Sequence, the Way to See the Macro & Micro of OG Your Orton Gillingham Scope and Sequence is your roadmap as a teacher, and it can also serve as a check-list. It’s a great way to see the broad picture of your subject. Many curriculums that are as comprehensive as OG come with a scope and sequence. In the OGforALL Scope and Sequence Workbooks, each book comes with a broad scope and sequence as well as a smaller, “what’s in the book,” scope and sequence. How Do You Know it’s an OG Scope & Sequence? Orton Gillingham starts with the most...

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables


Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables Closed syllable is the first syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC syllable patterns. Initial Terms A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not need to know the concept of what a syllable is in full to teach the closed syllable pattern, but you will want to use the words, “The consonant at the end makes the vowel short. This is a closed syllable.” If you do give a definition of a syllable, it can be something like, “words are made...

Orton Gillingham Coaching: Let’s Talk About the “Hearing-It” in Multi-Sensory. Using Phonemic Awareness in Lessons.


We talk about Orton Gillingham being multi-sensory. Multi-sensory means we want students of OG to hear the language (auditory), see the language (visual) and use the language as kinesthetic (feel/write). When we combine these three prongs we get a multi-sensory approach, meaning all of these senses are being used by a student to learn.  The auditory portion of the multi-sensory approach often gets put on the back-burner to the “writing it” and “see it” because it is easier to go through the cards or do a worksheet, but “hearing it” is one of the most important parts of Orton Gillingham. Auditory exercises...