Orton Gillingham for All

A Harvest of VCCV Patterns

on May 13, 2013

My last post was on the different patterns that make up syllable division. Now, I want to go through each pattern and how to label a word for easy pronunciation. If you have not read the post(s) on REVLOC, please read that now, and come back. It is important to have an understanding of REVLOC before dividing words, because after dividing the words into syllables, the rules of REVLOC will make pronunciation of the word much easier.

The first pattern (I learned in the OG course I took) is VCCV, or Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel. There are four different kinds of VCCV word patterns. They are labeled according to REVLOC syllable types.

They are:

Rabbit                           Two closed syllables

Reptile                          One Closed, One Magic E syllables

Candy                           One Closed, One Open syllables

Hornet                          One Closed, One R-Controlled syllables

To determine the type of word, we underline vowels, label the pattern, (in this case) divide between the two consonants, label each syllable based on REVLOC, and use that labeling to pronounce the word.

Here is an example of the dividing of each:

VCCV

Here are examples of each type of word patterns. See if you can divide them!

Rabbit words. Underline vowels, divide between consonants, label syllable according to REVLOC.

Plastic

Muffin

Mutton

Segment

Aspen

Puffin

Tennis

Velvet

Dentist

Bandit

Sudden

Goblet

Sandal

Signal

In order to make sure a student is grasping the concept and not just memorizing words, it is common to use nonsense words in exercises. Below is an example of some nonsense words to divide.

Flimsat

Hegnon

Vindip

Dibsob

Wombud

Kinvit

Uglol

Algam

Lansut

In addition to coding words, students should practice reading all words out loud. This fortifies the understanding of the different syllable types and the sounds they make. Students should even read the nonsense words.

Reptile Words. One closed and one magic e syllable. Divide between two consonants in VCCV pattern.

Hemline

Stampede

Sunshine

Costume

Dictate

Baptize

Ignite

Compile

Confide

Dislike

Candy words. One closed syllable, one open syllable. VCCV divide between the two consonants.

Taffy

Lobby

Fifty

Dusty

Hobby

Nanny

Sixty

Handy

Bumpy

Floppy

Plenty

Ugly

Nifty

Thrifty

Jiffy

Kitty

Pansy

Witty

Caddy

Hornet Words. One of the syllables will be R-controlled. Divide between the two consonants.

Market

Butler

Marlin

Banner

Garnet

Orbit

Border

Tardy

Scamper

Termite

Otter

Lumber

Hammer

Garment

Fender

Rafter

Perfume – R controlled and magic e

Burly – R controlled and open

Garlic

Sister

Derby

Harness

Garden

Harvest

Limber

Scarlet

Sherbet

Here is a list of three syllable VCCV words. And a picture of how they would be labeled.

Fantastic

Encompass

Confiscate

Atlantic

Indignant

Compensate

Insistent

photo (1)

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12 responses to “A Harvest of VCCV Patterns

  1. This is great! I’m going to add this site to me need to read list!

  2. D says:

    thanks, nice post.

  3. […] you have not yet read the posts on REVLOC, VCCV, and VCV, I suggest reading those and coming back to this post. OG is a system that builds one […]

  4. […] VCCV (rabbit, hornet, candy words): Divide between the two consonants.          Mag net […]

  5. Byron says:

    This is a very good site for me while doing my homework. I hope that you will come up with more very sophisticated words.
    From Byron
    To (whoever you are)

  6. Wow, I was amazed to find this information today! I am an ESE elementary school teacher who has gone through the training of Project Read.Project Read teaches the 5 cutting patterns and 7 syllabication types. I wanted to start teaching my 8 year old this way of decoding ,so when I searched for vccv words I came across your sight. I am SO EXCITED! I did a lesson with her and my niece with vccv and used your terminology of “rabbit,reptile, candy, hornet” words and it went so well! I made a color coded list of each type and taught them how to “cut/mark” the words. Thank you so much! I am now visiting your other posts to check out that terminoglogy….like camal and tiger words. This is awesome!

    • momssoulcafe says:

      Hi Michelle, Thank you for letting me know my blog is helping. It’s why I do it! Let me know if you have any questions. 😊

  7. Angela T says:

    Fantastic blog – thank you so much for sharing

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