Orton Gillingham for All

Short Vowel Rule: This FLOSS is Not About Teeth

Today’s topic is FLOSS, and I’m not talking about teeth here. FLOSS is a helpful reminder to a short vowel rule that says: double f, l and s after a short vowel at the end of a ONE SYLLABLE word.  This concept is taught in mainstream methods, but calling it FLOSS is something done in OG.

For example:

F

Cliff

Sniff

Off

Huff

Staff

L

Hill

Hall

Ill

Roll

S

Bass

Dress

Fuss

Glass

Seen here is a whole list of words from a book, How to Teach Spelling.

floss words

As in most rules, there are exceptions to the FLOSS rule.

First, when a final s makes the “z” sound it is never doubled, Examples: is, as, has, was, his

These words do NOT double, but if we were following the rule, they would.

Examples: Bus, gas, plus, if, chef, gal

 

And, some words double but they should NOT.

Examples: egg, odd, add, err, shirr

 

Some proper names ending in consonants will double.

Examples: Matt, Todd, Squibb

See the worksheet here for a great representation of the FLOSS rule. As you can tell, the O in FLOSS is just there to create the word to help to remember the other three letters.

Floss cloud sheet

Here is another worksheet on FLOSS that gives dictation and examples.

Floss work

Another letter that doubles after a short vowel in a one syllable word in most cases is z.

Z

Buzz

Fuzz

Jazz

Fizz

 

Now, about your teeth, have you FLOSSed lately?

11 Comments »

Welcome Gentle Cindy, C&G Rule

I haven’t disappeared, I am taking a real estate course and it is taking up much of my time these days. The good thing is that it takes only a couple of months and I will have a license to sell real estate!

I miss writing though. So I am taking a break from studying to let you know about a rule that comes in handy when reading. The rule is called the C and G rule. What the C & G rules says is, if you have a C or a G followed by an E, I, or Y, then the C takes on the “s” sound and the G takes on the “J” sound.

Important to remember is that the e, I, or y FOLLOWS the C or G. If is BEFORE the C or G, then this rule does not apply.

Have you ever wondered why the word Cat starts with a C but Kitty or Kitten start with a K? It is the C & G rule in action.

Cat – c a t             The c says “k”

BUT, if you were to spell  Kitty, Citty, the C would no longer be “k” sound it would be a “s” sound as in “City.” So in order to keep the “k” sound, we must change the “C” in Cat to a K. Same with Kitten. If we kept that C that we use to spell Cat, we would have a Citten, and it would be pronounced “S”itten.

Here are examples of the C saying “s”:

City

Cyst

Cycle

Cement

Examples of G saying “j”:

Gem

Gist

Gym

Gerbil

Gentle Cindy is a great graphic to remind us of the C & G Rule.

Gentle Cindy

6 Comments »

%d bloggers like this: