• Consonants & Vowels,  Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Magic-E (Silent E) Syllables, Tools & Strategies

    Teaching Magic-E (Silent E) Syllables, Tools & Strategies Magic E is the second syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC system of syllable patterns. Magic E Syllable Pattern The Magic E pattern is VCE – Vowel, Consonant, Silent E at the end. The silent E makes the vowel say its name, giving it a long vowel sound. What a Student Should Know to Learn the Magic-E Pattern A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not have to know the concept of what a syllable is in full to teach the Magic E syllable…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables

    Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables Closed syllable is the first syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC syllable patterns. Initial Terms A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not need to know the concept of what a syllable is in full to teach the closed syllable pattern, but you will want to use the words, “The consonant at the end makes the vowel short. This is a closed syllable.” If you do give a definition of a syllable, it can be something like, “words are made of syllables,” or “a syllable is a part…

  • Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Syllable Types & Strategies for Teaching the Concept of Syllables

    Syllable types are a big part of Orton Gillingham teaching. Syllable types lead to syllable division, and syllable division leads to reading fluency. This video explains the REVLOC system of syllable types, the teaching order of syllable types, how to introduce the concept of syllables, and strategies for teaching closed syllables. Links: Scope & Sequence Workbooks: https://bit.ly/2YN0XDP Workbook Store: https://bit.ly/3llnvDp Sheet with REVLOC Explained in Video: https://bit.ly/3Ae04RZ Whiteboard in video: https://amzn.to/3zxk1CL SYLLABLE DOMINANCE – REVLOC In OG we use REVLOC as a Guide for Syllable Types. It’s a made-up word that gives us the syllable names for decoding words later. We start by teaching syllable types. REVLOC stands for R-Controlled,…

  • Tips and Games,  Types of Syllables

    REVLOC Game Online, Fun with Syllable Division

    Syllable labeling and division is a major foundation of the Orton Gillingham approach. I posted, April 2020, a REVLOC game with a printout that you could cut out and have students sort syllables. Now, with many kids learning from home, I created a sorting game online. How To Play The colored blocks (at the bottom of the board) are the REVLOC + Misc. for each grid square. A student will need to drag those REVLOC letters to the top of each square in the grid. They can then drag each syllable to the appropriate square in REVLOC. If you have a student who is not familiar with one or more…

  • Syllable Division,  Tips and Games,  Tools,  Types of Syllables

    REVLOC Syllable Sorting Game

    If you want to do something with a student that feels like a game, sorting syllables is a fun way to get going. There aren’t many rules. I have attached a cutout to this post for download. You can print it, cut it out and get started. You can also make more syllables and keep going once your student has conquered these. First, put REVLOC and “other” lined across the top. If your student is only capable of Open and Closed then you can put the O and C at the top and add more to the line as the student gets more advanced. “Other” is for Latin Connectives, Prefixes…

  • Types of Syllables

    Always, Then, Last: REVLOC order

    In my Orton Gillingham journey I’ve heard some who use the word CLOVER to teach syllable types. In the class I took, the word to remember syllable types is REVLOC. The reason for using REVLOC is that this is the order of the syllable for labeling. CLOVER may be an actual word, but REVLOC will give better guidance when trying to decode a word by remembering which syllable types overrule the next. I’ll give an example and then you can see the attached sheet for further explanation. The syllable: tur At first glance, it might seem that this is a closed syllable. But closer inspection tells us that the syllable…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Go to the End and Count Back Three, if You See Consonant + LE

    The syllable pattern in REVLOC is is a departure from the Vowel-Consontant-Vowel patterns. This one is Consonant+LE. It is the L in REVLOC. If you have not read the post on REVLOC, please read it and come back. When you have a word with a Consonant+LE at the end, count back three letters, then divide the word. Consontant + LE is ALWAYS at the end of the word. The C+LE endings are: ble dle fle gle kle tle zle ple They are pronounced as: ble = b’l (as in bubble) dle = d’l (as in idle) fle = f’l (as in ruffle) gle = g’l (as in giggle) kle =…

  • Suffix Rules,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    More Syllable Division: The Long & Short of –ci, -si, -ti, -xi

    Today, I received a great question from a reader. After my last post on syllable division, she asked me, “What do you say about the letter i in the following examples: div i sion in ci sion de li cious am bi tion ig ni tion???” I can understand the confusion, based on my previous posts. According to what I have said so far, those I’s should be long because the syllable is considered open. Now we get into a more advanced rule of division. It has to do with the suffixes on those words. This division rule has to do with -ci, -si, -ti, -xi being suffixes. They are…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    A Mountain View: Labeling and Syllable Division

    We have covered all of the components of REVLOC and the different syllable division rules. Today, I would like to condense that down to an overview, so, hopefully, a bigger picture can be formed. First, REVLOC, stands for types of syllables. These syllables are then classified by the corresponding letter from the REVLOC system. Once classified (or maybe labeled is a better term), the word can be broken down and pronounced based on the rules associated with each syllable type. The word “REVLOC” is what it is because that is the order in which each syllable type should be considered in pronunciation. For example, the word “war” might look like…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    It’s Just an Ostrich! VCCCV Patterns

    Now that we have gotten through the more challenging VCV syllable pattern, we can move to the next in line – VCCCV, Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel. Even though it looks longer and possibly more challenging, this one requires less work to break up than VCV. If you have not yet read the posts on REVLOC, VCCV, and VCV, I suggest reading those and coming back to this post. Orton Gillingham is a system that builds one section of lessons upon the next. This is the section called Syllable Division Rules. The class I took, we called the VCCCV pattern Ostrich words. The main rule about Ostrich words is that when dividing, allow the…