How to Teach Short Vowel Rules and 19 Activities to Help


Orton Gillingham is an effective approach to learning the English language because it has rules to help remember why something happens the way it happens. Short vowel rules are some of the first taught in OG. There are four of these rules – FLOSS, “K” Rule, “CH” Rule, and “J” Rule. Something to remember going into any OG rule is that there will always be exceptions, but you can teach the rules as a general truth and be sure to tell students that there are exceptions to every rule. WHEN TO TEACH On my Scope and Sequence we start early, around the...

How to Teach Schwa from Orton Gillingham Coaching


Understanding schwa can be hard for students and tricky for teachers and tutors to explain. This video has an explanation of schwa with how and when to teach it as well as activities. Want more? A full article is here: Activities to Make Schwa Fun and Engaging - Orton Gillingham for All (ogforall.com) More Learning OGforALL Workbook Store: https://bit.ly/3llnvDp Scope & Sequence Workbooks: https://bit.ly/2YN0XDP Teachers Pay Teachers Store: https://bit.ly/4acxF1e******* FTC: Some links included in this description might be affiliate links. If you purchase a product through one of them, I will receive a commission (at no additional cost to you). I truly...

Activities to Make Schwa Fun and Engaging


Understanding and recognizing schwa is crucial for students, as it often plays a big role in pronouncing and accenting words. What is Schwa? The schwa sound is one of the most common sounds in the English language. It’s represented by the upside-down lowercase "e." It occurs when a vowel in an unstressed syllable is reduced to a neutral sound, which sounds like a short u sound. The schwa sound allows for smoother and faster speech, making it a key component of natural spoken English, and it can be found in a variety of positions within words, such as the second syllable...

Help with b and d confusion, Strategies and Activities (Video)


From Orton Gillingham Coaching (Video) Most tutors and teachers of Orton Gillingham have a student (or 10!) that confuse “b” and “d.”  It’s a common challenge for kids, but throw in a dyslexia diagnosis, and it gets even harder. There are several strategies to use to help students overcome this issue. ***** Product Links: OGforALL Workbook Store: https://bit.ly/3llnvDp Scope & Sequence Workbooks: https://bit.ly/2YN0XDP Teachers Pay Teachers Store: https://bit.ly/4acxF1e Products to help Less Messy than Sand or Shaving Cream: Sandpaper Letters, Lowercase only: https://amzn.to/3APKAnq Sandpaper Letters, Uppercase & Lowercase: https://amzn.to/3BXZ5XN Sand Trays & Sand: Sand Trays: https://amzn.to/3aQgRQy Sand (25 lbs., sand color): https://amzn.to/3AVi0kD...

4 Ways to Cope with b and d Confusion


Most tutors and teachers of Orton Gillingham have a student (or 10!) that confuse “b” and “d.”  It’s a common challenge for kids, but throw in a dyslexia diagnosis, and it gets even harder. There are several strategies to use to help students overcome this issue. Why Is It Common to Confuse b and d? The confusion between "b" and "d" is common because the letters are mirror images of each other. This can make it difficult for children to distinguish between the two, especially when they are first learning to read and write. When to teach b and d When teaching b...

Reasons English Words Do Not End in V


In English, no word in the language ends with the letter "v" unless it is followed by the letter "e." This is something that sets English apart from many other languages. In Orton Gillingham, we can teach the saying, “No English words end in V, it will always be followed by an E.” A Brief History in Why Words Do Not End In V In the early stages of English, the letter "v" was used more frequently than it is today. However, at that time, it was not uncommon for writers to use "v" and "u" interchangeably. In the 16th century the “u” and “v”...

Struggling to Blend Letters to Words, Help is Here


My Student Can Isolate Sounds but Struggles to Blend CVC Words There are reasons it’s hard for students to go from isolated sounds to blending. It’s not just incomprehension, it has to do with moving from doing one task, making one sound, to now doing three things, blending three sounds and thinking about how those fit together. It’s a jump for younger kids and includes cognitive processes, memory and phonemic awareness. Even kids with dyslexia and executive functioning challenges can get there. It requires repetition and patience. Helpful Activities to CVC Blending #1 Phoneme Work First, make sure they can hear the sounds of...

From Isolated Sounds to Blending CVC from Orton Gillingham Coaching


There are reasons it’s hard for students to go from isolated sounds to blending. It’s not just incomprehension, it has to do with moving from doing one task, making one sound, to now doing three things, blending three sounds. It’s a jump for younger kids and includes cognitive processes, memory and phonemic awareness. This video goes through the process of why students may struggle and activities you can use to help. Full Article available. ***** Products Whisper Phones https://amzn.to/3H5YOph Students speak softly into the "receiver" and hear their amplified voice directed into their own ear. It’s a good multi-sensory way to...

6 Easy Steps to Teach Better Spelling (Video): SOS Technique


6 Easy Steps to Spelling Better: SOS Spelling Technique Spelling can be a challenge for both kids and adults but throw in a word that makes no sense phonetically, (especially when you are teaching phonics!), and it can throw students for a loop. Simultaneous Oral Spelling (SOS Technique) can be a spelling-lifesaver. It’s used in multi-sensory learning approaches like Orton Gillingham. Multisensory Approach Multisensory means we want students to hear what they see and spell what they hear. To do this, we use lesson plans including auditory, visual and kinesthetic parts. In an approach like Orton Gillingham, we start with phonemic awareness,...

How to Teach Consonant LE Syllable Pattern from Orton Gillingham Coaching


Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Consonant LE Syllables, Tools & Strategies In Orton Gillingham we learn to use Syllable Types to label syllables. Eventually, this leads to syllable division. Consonant + LE is the fifth syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC system of syllable patterns. Consonant + LE Syllable Pattern The Consonant LE Syllable pattern is a Consonant with an LE, in words like cuddle and title.  It is always found at the end of words. In labeling syllables, Consonant LE is labeled as L – the L in revLoc. Initial Terms Needed to Get Consonant LE A student must know...