• Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    A Mountain View: Labeling and Syllable Division

    We have covered all of the components of REVLOC and the different syllable division rules. Today, I would like to condense that down to an overview, so, hopefully, a bigger picture can be formed. First, REVLOC, stands for types of syllables. These syllables are then classified by the corresponding letter from the REVLOC system. Once classified (or maybe labeled is a better term), the word can be broken down and pronounced based on the rules associated with each syllable type. The word “REVLOC” is what it is because that is the order in which each syllable type should be considered in pronunciation. For example, the word “war” might look like…

  • Sight Words

    SOS – A Technique to Save Spelling

    In learning through OG, words are broken down into the REVLOC system and pronounced by rules. But what about sight words? Those pesky words that do not follow the rules and you just have to memorize. OG has that covered too. I would like to introduce a learning technique called SOS. This stands for Simultaneous Oral Spelling.  One thing to remember to digest this technique is that Orton Gillingham uses multi-sensory tools to learn the English language. We want to see it, feel it and hear it – all of “it.” Learning to spell can be challenging for anyone, but throw in a word that makes no sense in its…

  • Short Vowel Rules

    Short Vowel Rule: This FLOSS is Not About Teeth

    Today’s topic is FLOSS, and I’m not talking about teeth here. FLOSS is a helpful reminder to a short vowel rule that says: double f, l and s after a short vowel at the end of a ONE SYLLABLE word.  This concept is taught in mainstream methods, but calling it FLOSS is something done in OG. For example: F Cliff Sniff Off Huff Staff L Hill sell Ill pill S Bass Dress Fuss Glass Seen here is a whole list of words from a book, How to Teach Spelling. As in most rules, there are exceptions to the FLOSS rule. First, when a final s makes the “z” sound it…

  • Miscellaneous Rules

    Welcome Gentle Cindy, C&G Rule

    I haven’t disappeared, I am taking a real estate course and it is taking up much of my time these days. The good thing is that it takes only a couple of months and I will have a license to sell real estate! I miss writing though. So I am taking a break from studying to let you know about a rule that comes in handy when reading. The rule is called the C and G rule. What the C & G rules says is, if you have a C or a G followed by an E, I, or Y, then the C takes on the “s” sound and the…

  • Syllable Division

    Go to the End and Count Back Three, if You See Consonant + LE

    The syllable pattern in REVLOC is is a departure from the Vowel-Consontant-Vowel patterns. This one is Consonant+LE. It is the L in REVLOC. If you have not read the post on REVLOC, please read it and come back. When you have a word with a Consonant+LE at the end, count back three letters, then divide the word. Consontant + LE is ALWAYS at the end of the word. The C+LE endings are: • ble • dle • fle • gle • kle • tle • zle • ple They are pronounced as: • ble = b’l (as in bubble) • dle = d’l (as in idle) • fle = f’l…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Uncategorized

    Get Mixed, Blends & Digraphs

    In my last post of the VCCCV syllable division pattern, or Ostrich words, I talked about blends and digraphs, and I said I would make my next post on these concepts so that Ostrich words will make more sense. That was three Mondays ago – I was out of town in Florida visiting my mom for the past two weeks. Even though I had good intentions of posting, it didn’t happen. But, now I’m back and ready to talk about Blends and Digraphs. First, let’s cover blends. Blends are consonants that when put together we can hear the pronunciation of each letter sound. For example, BL is “b,” “l” as…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    It’s Just an Ostrich! VCCCV Patterns

    Now that we have gotten through the more challenging VCV syllable pattern, we can move to the next in line – VCCCV, Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel. Even though it looks longer and possibly more challenging, this one requires less work to break up than VCV. If you have not yet read the posts on REVLOC, VCCV, and VCV, I suggest reading those and coming back to this post. Orton Gillingham is a system that builds one section of lessons upon the next. This is the section called Syllable Division Rules. The class I took, we called the VCCCV pattern Ostrich words. The main rule about Ostrich words is that when dividing, allow the…

  • Accenting Rules,  Syllable Division

    VCV – the Tiger and the Camel Slept in a Motel in Japan

    Hopefully everyone has been practicing the VCCV pattern while I have been away. My kids just got out of school so I’ve been busy with end of year madness. Today we move into VCV – or vowel consonant vowel – patterns. If you have not read the posts on REVLOC or VCCV please do that now and come back. Each of these posts builds on the next. There are not as many pattern types in VCV as there are in VCCV, but breaking the words up into syllables becomes a tad more difficult now, because we have to place an emphasis on accenting of the syllable. That determines where we…

  • Syllable Division

    A Harvest of VCCV Patterns

    My last post was on the different patterns that make up syllable division. Now, I want to go through each pattern and how to label a word for easy pronunciation. If you have not read the post(s) on REVLOC, please read that now, and come back. It is important to have an understanding of REVLOC before dividing words, because after dividing the words into syllables, the rules of REVLOC will make pronunciation of the word much easier. The first pattern (I learned in the OG course I took) is VCCV, or Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel. There are four different kinds of VCCV word patterns. They are labeled according to REVLOC syllable types. They…

  • Syllable Division

    The Essence of OG Word Patterns & Syllable Division

    When studying Orton Gillingham, one of the main focuses of the program is on dividing words into syllables (known as syllable division). The one and only point of syllable division is to pronounce the word. Nothing else. This means, if someone does not perfectly divide up the word, but is still able pronounce the word based on how it was divided, the person doing the dividing should consider that they succeeded in their mission. With that said, we still want to learn the rules to syllable division because it makes learning easier when there are rules to follow, rather than just trying to haphazardly divide a word and pronounce it.…