• Short Vowel Rules

    Short Vowel Rule: “K” Rule — The Pick for Learning when to use –CK

    In Orton Gillingham, basically the whole English language is divided up into categories and each category is divided into rules. I have given one “Short Vowel Rule,” known as the FLOSS rule. Today, I am moving to a second (of four) short vowel rules: the “K” Rule. The “K” rule says, -ck is used after one short vowel at the end of one syllable words to spell “k.” This means, one syllable words that contain a short vowel and the “k” sound at the end will have a –ck to make the “k” sound. If there is not a SHORT vowel sound, then it is not –ck. Examples of when…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    CLOSED Syllables – Breaking down REVLOC

    For the purpose of understanding the REVLOC system, we can look at each syllable type more closely. First, let’s define what a syllable is. A syllable must contain a vowel. As in nan ny – two syllables. (In this case, the first syllable is closed and the second is open.) A syllable can be a stand-alone vowel, but not a stand-alone consonant. As in, a lone (the a is a syllable and a schwa). I’ve gone through what REVLOC is, but now I want to go through each letter in individual posts. Starting with C. C stands for closed syllable. A closed syllable is one that has consonants “closing in”…