• Syllable Division

    A Harvest of VCCV Patterns

    My last post was on the different patterns that make up syllable division. Now, I want to go through each pattern and how to label a word for easy pronunciation. If you have not read the post(s) on REVLOC, please read that now, and come back. It is important to have an understanding of REVLOC before dividing words, because after dividing the words into syllables, the rules of REVLOC will make pronunciation of the word much easier. The first pattern (I learned in the OG course I took) is VCCV, or Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel. There are four different kinds of VCCV word patterns. They are labeled according to REVLOC syllable types. They…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Suffix Rules

    We Sailed and Jumped into a Twisted -ED (the suffix)

    Hearing letter sounds is a major key to learning to write and understand English. It can be confusing because many letters or letter combinations have more than one sound. Today I will go over one of the combinations – the suffix –ed. The suffix –ed is used to represent past tense; plenty of even smaller children may realize this. What a person may not have given attention to is that –ed makes three different sounds. A sentence to represent this  (and practice) is: He rented a boat, jumped in and sailed off. Hear it? Rented — /ed/  (said like the name, Ed) Jumped — /t/ (sounds like the sound of a “t”)…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    They Come as a Team – Vowel Teams

    So we’ve now gone through all of the syllable types except one in the REVLOC system of syllable division. We have covered C, E, O, R, and L. The final type of syllable is Vowel Teams – the V.  These vowel teams are vowel sounds (it’s the sound, not just the letters) formed by two or more letters (notice it is letters, not vowels) within the same syllable. For example: Bee Bread Boy Light Eight   In dividing a word, a Vowel Team syllable will look like this: Conceit                                      con (closed or C)  ceit (vowel team or V) As a side note: is this a vowel team?  The word: Quit? …

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    CLOSED Syllables – Breaking down REVLOC

    For the purpose of understanding the REVLOC system, we can look at each syllable type more closely. First, let’s define what a syllable is. A syllable must contain a vowel. As in nan ny – two syllables. (In this case, the first syllable is closed and the second is open.) A syllable can be a stand-alone vowel, but not a stand-alone consonant. As in, a lone (the a is a syllable and a schwa). I’ve gone through what REVLOC is, but now I want to go through each letter in individual posts. Starting with C. C stands for closed syllable. A closed syllable is one that has consonants “closing in”…