• Prefixes/Suffixes

    Prefixes: Enlivened Vocabulary

    A prefix is a vowel or a syllable placed at the beginning of a word to change the meaning of the word. English is a language made up of many other languages. Its three most common sources are Anglo-Saxon (less than 1%), Greek (11%) and Latin (55%)*. Words are made up of prefixes, suffixes and roots. Knowing the meanings of each will aid in decoding and spelling. ֎ Anglo-Saxon words with Germanic roots we use every day: Man, wife, child, brother, fight, love, drink, sleep, eat, house, to, for, but, and, in, on ֎ “Of almost 3,000 prefix words found in textbooks, grades 3-9, words beginning with un-, re-, in-(meaning…

  • Consonants & Vowels

    More Facts – Vowel Facts

    Facts About Vowels All single vowels have more than one sound: they all make a long sound, a short sound and a schwa sound. For example: baby = “ā,” apple = “ă,” bandage = “Ə” Short vowels are indicated with a breve – ă 60% of English words have short vowel sounds A vowel followed by a consonant (closed syllable) is usually short = VC. Examples: at, dog, bid, sat, mat, plat, slug ●Exceptions: a vowel followed by the letters r, l, w, or y is NOT short. Curb Call Cow Delay Magic E – the Magic E pattern is VCE. E at the end of the word usually makes…