• Consonants & Vowels,  Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Open Syllables, Tools and Strategies

    Teaching Open Syllables, Tools & Strategies Open Syllable is the third syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC system of syllable patterns. Open Syllable Pattern The Open Syllable pattern is CV or V – Consonant, Vowel (or just Vowel). The open vowel at the end of the syllable makes the vowel long, or “makes the vowel say its name.” Initial Terms A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. By this point, you will already have taught Closed and Magic E patterns.* You will have started with VCCV syllable division.* So, now your student should have…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Magic-E (Silent E) Syllables, Tools & Strategies

    Teaching Magic-E (Silent E) Syllables, Tools & Strategies Magic E is the second syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC system of syllable patterns. Magic E Syllable Pattern The Magic E pattern is VCE – Vowel, Consonant, Silent E at the end. The silent E makes the vowel say its name, giving it a long vowel sound. What a Student Should Know to Learn the Magic-E Pattern A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not have to know the concept of what a syllable is in full to teach the Magic E syllable…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables

    Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables Closed syllable is the first syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC syllable patterns. Initial Terms A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not need to know the concept of what a syllable is in full to teach the closed syllable pattern, but you will want to use the words, “The consonant at the end makes the vowel short. This is a closed syllable.” If you do give a definition of a syllable, it can be something like, “words are made of syllables,” or “a syllable is a part…

  • Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Syllable Types & Strategies for Teaching the Concept of Syllables

    Syllable types are a big part of Orton Gillingham teaching. Syllable types lead to syllable division, and syllable division leads to reading fluency. This video explains the REVLOC system of syllable types, the teaching order of syllable types, how to introduce the concept of syllables, and strategies for teaching closed syllables. Links: Scope & Sequence Workbooks: https://bit.ly/2YN0XDP Workbook Store: https://bit.ly/3llnvDp Sheet with REVLOC Explained in Video: https://bit.ly/3Ae04RZ Whiteboard in video: https://amzn.to/3zxk1CL SYLLABLE DOMINANCE – REVLOC In OG we use REVLOC as a Guide for Syllable Types. It’s a made-up word that gives us the syllable names for decoding words later. We start by teaching syllable types. REVLOC stands for R-Controlled,…

  • Short Vowel Rules

    Strategies for Teaching Short Vowel Rule: “CH” Rule

    The best part of using Orton Gillingham to teach or tutor is that the rules are clearly defined. For the Short Vowel Rules there is FLOSS, “CH” Rule, “J” Rule, and “K” Rule. Today we are going to talk about strategies for teaching “CH” Rule. Typically, Short Vowel Rule words are simple looking, one-syllable words that come from the Anglo-Saxon language. Words like, sack, dodge, grass, hatch. Longer words are typically Greek or Latin words. “CH” Rule Defined The “CH” Rule says, -tch is used after one short vowel at the end of one syllable words to spell “ch.” “CH” Rule Strategies The sound “ch” is usually spelled with ch…

  • Accenting Rules

    No Stress Over Accenting Rules

    Accenting is something that can be taught early in Orton Gillingham, but the advanced rules are for advanced decoding and fall much later in the OG scope and sequence. Accenting is to aid in pronouncing words correctly – that’s the goal. If a student looks a word up in a dictionary (online these days) and sees an accent mark, they will know how to use that accent mark to pronounce the word. Early Accenting These first, simple accenting exercises are to introduce accenting. Say it both ways. The best way to teach early accenting is to have the student say the word both ways and decide what makes the most…

  • Tips and Games,  Types of Syllables

    REVLOC Game Online, Fun with Syllable Division

    Syllable labeling and division is a major foundation of the Orton Gillingham approach. I posted, April 2020, a REVLOC game with a printout that you could cut out and have students sort syllables. Now, with many kids learning from home, I created a sorting game online. How To Play The colored blocks (at the bottom of the board) are the REVLOC + Misc. for each grid square. A student will need to drag those REVLOC letters to the top of each square in the grid. They can then drag each syllable to the appropriate square in REVLOC. If you have a student who is not familiar with one or more…

  • Syllable Division

    A Lion or a Poem: Dividing Vowel Team Words

    In dividing words with vowel teams in Orton Gillingham there are two types: Lion Words Lion Words. In Lion words there will be a reversal of vowel teams. For example, io as in lion, rather than oi as in oil. Another example is ia as in dial, rather than ai as in rain. When a student sees the reversal, it means, in most cases, the team will be divided (split up) and the first vowel will be long. ◊ In Lion Words, these are vowels that are together, but they are not vowel teams and you would never teach this concept before teaching vowel teams. ◊ Examples: Eon is e…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Go to the End and Count Back Three, if You See Consonant + LE

    The syllable pattern in REVLOC is is a departure from the Vowel-Consontant-Vowel patterns. This one is Consonant+LE. It is the L in REVLOC. If you have not read the post on REVLOC, please read it and come back. When you have a word with a Consonant+LE at the end, count back three letters, then divide the word. Consontant + LE is ALWAYS at the end of the word. The C+LE endings are: ble dle fle gle kle tle zle ple They are pronounced as: ble = b’l (as in bubble) dle = d’l (as in idle) fle = f’l (as in ruffle) gle = g’l (as in giggle) kle =…

  • Short Vowel Rules

    Short Vowel Rule Overview: FLOSS, Pitch, Judge, Stack

    My most recent posts covered the Short Vowel Rules in Orton Gillingham. Today I would like to give an overview of all four of these rules. I will also provide a practice worksheet and a quiz on these rules. Now that you have seen all four rules, grouping them together as “Short Vowel Rules” should make sense. If not, then once you see them in an overview, I think you will see a pattern. The first rule we covered was FLOSS. This rule says: FLOSS: Double f, l, and s at the end of one syllable words following one short vowel. Notice that the word FLOSS is an example of…