• Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Go to the End and Count Back Three, if You See Consonant + LE

    So, I have another blog called Moms Soul Café, which I posted to yesterday. Today, I was going through my past posts and noticed that I accidentally posted the following OG information to my Mom’s Soul Café blog. I imagine my audience was a tad confused about the relevance of Consonant + LE in that genre! But hopefully they learned a little something. The syllable pattern in REVLOC is is a departure from the Vowel-Consontant-Vowel patterns. This one is Consonant+LE. It is the L in REVLOC. If you have not read the post on REVLOC, please read it and come back. When you have a word with a Consonant+LE at…

  • Short Vowel Rules

    Short Vowel Rule Overview: FLOSS, Pitch, Judge, Stack

    My most recent posts covered the Short Vowel Rules in Orton Gillingham. Today I would like to give an overview of all four of these rules. I will also provide a practice worksheet and a quiz on these rules. Now that you have seen all four rules, grouping them together as “Short Vowel Rules” should make sense. If not, then once you see them in an overview, I think you will see a pattern. The first rule we covered was FLOSS. This rule says: FLOSS: Double f, l, and s at the end of one syllable words following one short vowel. Notice that the word FLOSS is an example of…

  • Short Vowel Rules

    Short Vowel Rule: “CH” Rule – An Important Batch of Words

    This week we will cover the last of the Short Vowel Rules in Orton Gillingham. So far, we have made it through FLOSS, “K” Rule, and the “J” Rule. The fourth and final short vowel rule is the “CH” Rule. The “CH” Rule says: -tch is used after one short vowel at the end of one syllable words to spell “ch.” This means, in a one syllable word where there is a short vowel sound followed by a “ch” sound, the letters –tch are being used to make that sound. Examples of this rule are: ă              snatch, match, hatch, patch ĕ             sketch, stretch, fetch, etch ĭ               ditch, snitch, stitch, switch…

  • Short Vowel Rules

    Short Vowel Rule: “J” Rule – Make a Pledge to Learn This Rule

    Following in the path of my post last week, today we cover the third of four Short Vowel Rules in Orton Gillingham. It is the “J” Rule. So far, we have covered FLOSS and the “K” Rule . The “J” rule says: -dge is used after one short vowel at the end of a one syllable word to spell “j.” This means, in a one syllable word where there is a short vowel sound followed by a “j” sound, the letters –dge are being used to make that sound. Examples of this rule are: ă       badge, cadge ĕ       pledge, edge, wedge, sedge, hedge, ledge ĭ        ridge, bridge, smidge ŏ       dodge,…

  • Suffix Rules,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    More Syllable Division: The Long & Short of –ci, -si, -ti, -xi

    Today, I received a great question from a reader. After my last post on syllable division, she asked me, “What do you say about the letter i in the following examples: div i sion in ci sion de li cious am bi tion ig ni tion???” I can understand the confusion, based on my previous posts. According to what I have said so far, those I’s should be long because the syllable is considered open. Now we get into a more advanced rule of division. It has to do with the suffixes on those words. This division rule has to do with -ci, -si, -ti, -xi being suffixes. They are…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    A Mountain View: Labeling and Syllable Division

    We have covered all of the components of REVLOC and the different syllable division rules. Today, I would like to condense that down to an overview, so, hopefully, a bigger picture can be formed. First, REVLOC, stands for types of syllables. These syllables are then classified by the corresponding letter from the REVLOC system. Once classified (or maybe labeled is a better term), the word can be broken down and pronounced based on the rules associated with each syllable type. The word “REVLOC” is what it is because that is the order in which each syllable type should be considered in pronunciation. For example, the word “war” might look like…

  • Syllable Division

    Go to the End and Count Back Three, if You See Consonant + LE

    The syllable pattern in REVLOC is is a departure from the Vowel-Consontant-Vowel patterns. This one is Consonant+LE. It is the L in REVLOC. If you have not read the post on REVLOC, please read it and come back. When you have a word with a Consonant+LE at the end, count back three letters, then divide the word. Consontant + LE is ALWAYS at the end of the word. The C+LE endings are: • ble • dle • fle • gle • kle • tle • zle • ple They are pronounced as: • ble = b’l (as in bubble) • dle = d’l (as in idle) • fle = f’l…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Uncategorized

    Get Mixed, Blends & Digraphs

    In my last post of the VCCCV syllable division pattern, or Ostrich words, I talked about blends and digraphs, and I said I would make my next post on these concepts so that Ostrich words will make more sense. That was three Mondays ago – I was out of town in Florida visiting my mom for the past two weeks. Even though I had good intentions of posting, it didn’t happen. But, now I’m back and ready to talk about Blends and Digraphs. First, let’s cover blends. Blends are consonants that when put together we can hear the pronunciation of each letter sound. For example, BL is “b,” “l” as…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    It’s Just an Ostrich! VCCCV Patterns

    Now that we have gotten through the more challenging VCV syllable pattern, we can move to the next in line – VCCCV, Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel. Even though it looks longer and possibly more challenging, this one requires less work to break up than VCV. If you have not yet read the posts on REVLOC, VCCV, and VCV, I suggest reading those and coming back to this post. OG is a system that builds one section of lessons upon the next. This is the section called Syllable Division Rules. The class I took, we called the VCCCV pattern Ostrich words. The main rule about Ostrich words is that when dividing, allow the consonants…

  • Accenting Rules,  Syllable Division

    VCV – the Tiger and the Camel Slept in a Motel in Japan

    Hopefully everyone has been practicing the VCCV pattern while I have been away. My kids just got out of school so I’ve been busy with end of year madness. Today we move into VCV – or vowel consonant vowel – patterns. If you have not read the posts on REVLOC or VCCV please do that now and come back. Each of these posts builds on the next. There are not as many pattern types in VCV as there are in VCCV, but breaking the words up into syllables becomes a tad more difficult now, because we have to place an emphasis on accenting of the syllable. That determines where we…