• Types of Syllables

    Always, Then, Last: REVLOC order

    In my Orton Gillingham journey I’ve heard some who use the word CLOVER to teach syllable types. In the class I took, the word to remember syllable types is REVLOC. The reason for using REVLOC is that this is the order of the syllable for labeling. CLOVER may be an actual word, but REVLOC will give better guidance when trying to decode a word by remembering which syllable types overrule the next. I’ll give an example and then you can see the attached sheet for further explanation. The syllable: tur At first glance, it might seem that this is a closed syllable. But closer inspection tells us that the syllable…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    A Mountain View: Labeling and Syllable Division

    We have covered all of the components of REVLOC and the different syllable division rules. Today, I would like to condense that down to an overview, so, hopefully, a bigger picture can be formed. First, REVLOC, stands for types of syllables. These syllables are then classified by the corresponding letter from the REVLOC system. Once classified (or maybe labeled is a better term), the word can be broken down and pronounced based on the rules associated with each syllable type. The word “REVLOC” is what it is because that is the order in which each syllable type should be considered in pronunciation. For example, the word “war” might look like…

  • Syllable Division

    The Essence of OG Word Patterns & Syllable Division

    When studying Orton Gillingham, one of the main focuses of the program is on dividing words into syllables (known as syllable division). The one and only point of syllable division is to pronounce the word. Nothing else. This means, if someone does not perfectly divide up the word, but is still able pronounce the word based on how it was divided, the person doing the dividing should consider that they succeeded in their mission. With that said, we still want to learn the rules to syllable division because it makes learning easier when there are rules to follow, rather than just trying to haphazardly divide a word and pronounce it.…