• Consonants & Vowels,  Orton Coaching Videos,  Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Orton Gillingham Coaching: Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables

    Teaching Closed (CVC) Syllables Closed syllable is the first syllable pattern you teach in Orton Gillingham in the REVLOC syllable patterns. Initial Terms A student must know what a vowel and consonant are to be able to grasp the concept of syllables. They do not need to know the concept of what a syllable is in full to teach the closed syllable pattern, but you will want to use the words, “The consonant at the end makes the vowel short. This is a closed syllable.” If you do give a definition of a syllable, it can be something like, “words are made of syllables,” or “a syllable is a part…

  • Tips and Games,  Types of Syllables

    REVLOC Game Online, Fun with Syllable Division

    Syllable labeling and division is a major foundation of the Orton Gillingham approach. I posted, April 2020, a REVLOC game with a printout that you could cut out and have students sort syllables. Now, with many kids learning from home, I created a sorting game online. How To Play The colored blocks (at the bottom of the board) are the REVLOC + Misc. for each grid square. A student will need to drag those REVLOC letters to the top of each square in the grid. They can then drag each syllable to the appropriate square in REVLOC. If you have a student who is not familiar with one or more…

  • Types of Syllables

    Always, Then, Last: REVLOC order

    In my Orton Gillingham journey I’ve heard some who use the word CLOVER to teach syllable types. In the class I took, the word to remember syllable types is REVLOC. The reason for using REVLOC is that this is the order of the syllable for labeling. CLOVER may be an actual word, but REVLOC will give better guidance when trying to decode a word by remembering which syllable types overrule the next. I’ll give an example and then you can see the attached sheet for further explanation. The syllable: tur At first glance, it might seem that this is a closed syllable. But closer inspection tells us that the syllable…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Go to the End and Count Back Three, if You See Consonant + LE

    The syllable pattern in REVLOC is is a departure from the Vowel-Consontant-Vowel patterns. This one is Consonant+LE. It is the L in REVLOC. If you have not read the post on REVLOC, please read it and come back. When you have a word with a Consonant+LE at the end, count back three letters, then divide the word. Consontant + LE is ALWAYS at the end of the word. The C+LE endings are: ble dle fle gle kle tle zle ple They are pronounced as: ble = b’l (as in bubble) dle = d’l (as in idle) fle = f’l (as in ruffle) gle = g’l (as in giggle) kle =…

  • Syllable Division

    The Essence of OG Word Patterns & Syllable Division

    When studying Orton Gillingham, one of the main focuses of the program is on dividing words into syllables (known as syllable division). The one and only point of syllable division is to pronounce the word. Nothing else. This means, if someone does not perfectly divide up the word, but is still able pronounce the word based on how it was divided, the person doing the dividing should consider that they succeeded in their mission. With that said, we still want to learn the rules to syllable division because it makes learning easier when there are rules to follow, rather than just trying to haphazardly divide a word and pronounce it.…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    Don’t Get Ruffled or Baffled by Consonant + le

    So far, I have covered R, E, O, C in the REVLOC system of breaking down words to provide rules for easier word pronunciation. Next, comes the L, which stands for Consonant + LE syllable types. This type of syllable ALWAYS appears at the END of words. The E (the vowel in this type of syllable) is ALWAYS silent. Dictionaries may represent this syllable pronunciation as /b’l/ (to indicate the silence of the e). Examples of consonant + le syllables: ble          able                       notice the split:  a  ble – a is an open syllable so it’s long, ble is cons. + le dle          cradle                    Split: cra (open), dle (cons. + le)…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    REVLOC Reveals Syllable Types

    What makes OG (Orton Gillingham) so special is the way it teaches the English language in broken down parts then re-assembles them into a whole; meaning that by the time one is older (or for an adult, towards the end of the learning sequence), one can see English from a broad perspective. A major component to help gain the overall perspective is REVLOC. In some circles they use CLOVER, but where I took the course, they call it REVLOC and soon I will reveal why. First, let me break down the answer to what REVLOC actually is. Each letter stands for a syllable type. Each syllable in a word is…