• Consonants & Vowels,  Spelling,  Vowel Teams

    Sound Spelling Versus Sound Reading

    Sound Spelling Versus Sound Reading, What’s the Difference? When taking an Orton Gillingham class, as a student or as a teacher, you will have two terms: Reading Consonant & Vowels and Spelling Consonants & Vowels. What’s the difference in the two? It can get a little confusing. Reading Consonant & Vowel Sounds When going through a consonant reading deck with a student they will use an s two ways, as two sounds, /s/ or /z/. The s can make two sounds, /s/ and /z/. Sound reading is asking, what sounds does this letter (or letter combination) make? Ideas to drill sound reading To drill sound reading, use decks from your…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Spelling,  Vowel Teams

    A Deeper Dive into Generalizations OI/OY, OU/OW, AU/AW

    I’ve written about Orton Gillingham Generalizations before, but I want to take a deeper dive into this topic. What Are Generalization Rules? Generalizations or Generalization Rules are vowel teams that sound alike and also have general rules or situations for when to use them. There are three: OI/OY saying “oi” as in oil/boy OU/OW saying “ou” as in out/cow AU/AW saying “ô” as in auto/paw Generalizations are rules associated with certain sounds that help know when to use each vowel team and in what position to use them in a word. They are tools for spelling and reading words. When do you use each Generalization? OI/OY Generalization Use oi at…

  • Syllable Division

    A Lion or a Poem: Dividing Vowel Team Words

    In dividing words with vowel teams in Orton Gillingham there are two types: Lion Words Lion Words. In Lion words there will be a reversal of vowel teams. For example, io as in lion, rather than oi as in oil. Another example is ia as in dial, rather than ai as in rain. When a student sees the reversal, it means, in most cases, the team will be divided (split up) and the first vowel will be long. ◊ In Lion Words, these are vowels that are together, but they are not vowel teams and you would never teach this concept before teaching vowel teams. ◊ Examples: Eon is e…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Spelling

    Spelling Is Easier with Generalization Rules: OI/OY, OU/OW, AU/AW

    In keeping with the past two posts on spelling consonant sounds and spelling vowel sounds, I am going to cover oi/oy, ou/ow, au/aw generalizations; when to use each to make their sounds. I mentioned these generalizations in my last post in a “Miscellaneous” category. Here I am going more in depth on when to use each letter combination. It can look confusing at first glance to read what I am writing below. If you are not familiar, take your time looking at the rules. Then do the worksheets (or hand give them to a student). On all of these combinations, the dictation is as important as the worksheet. Knowing which…

  • Consonants & Vowels,  Spelling

    Spelling Vowel Sounds: What Music They Make

    In my last post I talked about how to spell consonants. This week, we will cover how to spell vowels. It is important to note that when I say “spell” consonants and vowels I am talking about how letters can make more than one sound. For example, a makes a long and short sound, as in make and tack. But to spell the letter a, we can use many combinations to make the long a sound. For example, the long a sound can be spelled using the letters ai, as in rain, train, brain. The difference that comes out of this is, if someone asks, “What does the letter i…

  • Syllable Division,  Types of Syllables

    They Come as a Team – Vowel Teams

    So we’ve now gone through all of the syllable types except one in the REVLOC system of syllable division. We have covered C, E, O, R, and L. The final type of syllable is Vowel Teams – the V.  These vowel teams are vowel sounds (it’s the sound, not just the letters) formed by two or more letters (notice it is letters, not vowels) within the same syllable. For example: Bee Bread Boy Light Eight In dividing a word, a Vowel Team syllable will look like this: Conceit                                      con (closed or C)  ceit (vowel team or V) As a side note: is this a vowel team?  The word: Quit?  NO!…